COLOURFUL  ROMSEY

Bell  Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

Picture Below

 Angel Hotel

The Angel appeared in the oldest available directory,

that of 1784, when Richard Garrett was the licensee.

The present building dates from the beginning of the 19th century,

replacing an earlier one that burned down in 1800,

and there are clues to the existence of an earlier building on a similar layout.

These clues lie in the considerable depth of the building,

and in the presence of medieval cellars under the present structure.

The pub is now a restaurant, La Parisienne.

If you are interested in the pubs and inns of Romsey, the book,

So Drunk He Must Have Been To Romsey,

published by the LTVAS can be purchased from the Visitor Centre.

Bell Street - La Parisienne

Bell Street

Bell Street

Picture Below

Bell Inn

This was one of the Romsey public houses that catered for

well-to-do travellers of the turnpike era.

It was claimed that the Prince Regent once changed horses there.

The inn has existed for much longer than its façade might suspect,

and was already well established in the 17th century.

The building is now used as offices.

If you are interested in the pubs and inns of Romsey, the book,

So Drunk He Must Have Been To Romsey,

published by the LTVAS can be purchased from the Visitor Centre.

Bell Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

 Picture Below:

 Bell Antiques was previously a public house

This house changed its name from the Royal Oak to the Queens Head

in the middle of the 19th century ( c. 1853 and 1857 ). 

Use as a public house ended in 1911.

It is said that the building dates back to the 17th century.

If you are interested in the pubs and inns of Romsey, the book,

So Drunk He Must Have Been To Romsey,

published by the LTVAS can be purchased from the Visitor Centre.

Bell Street

Bell Street

Bell Street

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